Regimental Colours

Regimental Colours for the Ministry of Defence (MOD), United Kingdom.

A ‘Colour’ is a regimental standard, usually in the form of a large brocade and embroidery silk flag, carried by a particular regiment, along with its Queen’s Colour.

‘Colours’ were originally carried into battle so that soldiers of a particular unit could see where the rest of their unit was located at all times and used as a rallying point during the course of the battle. Although the Colours are no longer carried in battle, they constitute the symbol of the Regiments’ honour and represent its devotion to duty. As such they are held in the greatest esteem by the soldiers and officers. They are brought out on important parades and regimental occasions and are escorted by a ‘Colour Party’. 

Each year the Sovereign’s official birthday is celebrated by the ceremony of Trooping of the Colour, which takes place in June along Horse Guards Parade.

You may be interested to read our articles on ‘Trooping of the Colour’ and ‘Super Shiny Silks’.

Banner Cloth, All Silk

The Queen’s Colours

The Queen’s Colour Banner Cloth.

A Queen’s Colour differs from a regimental colour and is usually embroidered with the design of the Union Flag with a gold circle in the centre, within which the regiment’s name (and sometimes initials or number) are inscribed.

Humphries Weaving supply the pure silk Banner Cloth in Crimson for the Queen’s Colours.

Project reference: 1801

Regimental Colours

Various Regimental Colour Banner Cloths.

A Regimental Colour differs from the Queen’s Colour and is usually a plain flag in the colour of the regiment’s ‘facings’ (traditionally the colour of the lining of the redcoat jacket) or the Cross of St George, with the regiment’s insignia in the centre.

Humphries Weaving supply the Banner Cloth for regimental Colours; most traditionally in Crimson, Blue, Green, Yellow and White.

Project references: BANN

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