The Brighton Pavilion

The Brighton Pavilion

The Brighton Pavilion, also known as the Royal Pavilion, is a Grade I listed former royal residence located in Brighton, England.

Beginning in 1787, it was built in three stages as a seaside retreat for George, Prince of Wales, who became the Prince Regent in 1811. It is built in the Indo-Saracenic style prevalent in India for most of the 19th century. The current appearance of the Pavilion, with its domes and minarets, is the work of architect John Nash, who extended the building starting in 1815.

© Jim Holden/Royal Pavilion & Museums

The Saloon

In late 2014 Humphries Weaving were were approached by Annabel Westman FSA, textile historian & interiors consultant, as she was researching fabric for the restoration of the Saloon at Brighton Pavilion.

Described as ‘His Majesty’s Geranium and Gold’ and working from a watercolour of the room, Annabel described to Richard Humphries that the design included ‘yellow bird flower and scroll pattern’.

Richard dove into the Humphries Weaving archive and produced a black and white photographic image of a design that fitted the description.

From this small 6×4 image Natalie Jones began redrawing the design by hand to the full scale of 21 inches wide and 50 inches in length. A further 50 hours of CAD work followed, with Natalie and Jenny Dyer carefully plotting the trellis of rosettes that form part of the pattern and quarter drop repeat.

The Geranium and Gold pure silk tissue woven by Humphries Weaving has been used in wall panels, magnificent drapery and to cover furniture.

Project reference: 2513

 

Selling Silks; A merchants sample book is available to buy from the V&A

The Music Room Gallery

Known as ‘The Brighton Frett’ design, Humphries Weaving were commissioned to weave a reproduction of a discontinued cloth from Warner & Sons, some of which still remains.

The mercerised cotton and viscose fabric was supplied in several colourways including Lilac, Pale Gold and Teal and used to upholster furniture.

Project reference: 349 / 362

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